“No-Fail” Friday: Screen time

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Earlier this week, I shared my personal belief (and experience) that the effects of a regular mindfulness practice will probably show up in your everyday life before you ever reach a point where any of it feels “easy.” You may find that you’re less quickly irritated, that your fuse under frustration takes a little longer to pop, or maybe you catch yourself just a little sooner when your mind sets sail for somewhere else while your face is having a conversation right in front of you. You’re teaching yourself how to tolerate discomfort, and how to be real with yourself about how you respond to it, too. You learn what happens when you don’t let distraction take over. You learn to be with what is – with what you actually are.

So, while I always hope that our “no-fail” weekend mindfulness challenges are interesting for you, I also hope this weekend’s version makes you a little uncomfortable.  It’s good for you, I promise, and while it won’t last long, the positive side effects of it just may. Read More


Come through

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Mindfulness isn’t easy. Focusing your attention on one singular thing, returning your attention to that place when distractions – internal and external – try to pull you away, and maybe even trying to sit still for more than a few seconds…these intentions are the opposite of how we live our everyday lives. We never have to be focused on one thing – in fact, we hardly know how to be even if we wanted to. And if we’re going to be still for any period of time, we’re either going to be asleep or staring at a screen.

So, it’s no surprise that many people give up on mindfulness pretty early on. We don’t like to not be good at things, and society doesn’t exactly reinforce the value of contemplative thought these days. So why not just bail, right? And then, it happens…  Read More


“No-Fail” Friday: Outta my way

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This week’s main post was about finding the balance between the gentle discipline of mindfulness and the cultivation of space for unrestrained creativity in our very productive lives. The point (according to me) was that a little daily mindfulness can help to organize the sometimes chaotic chatter in our brains, not just by giving us moments of quiet peace, but also enabling us to be more efficient, and ideally, also creative.

So for this weekend’s mindfulness challenge, we’re flipping the script. Read More